Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

The UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) includes two departments--the Department of Education and the Department of Information Studies. Together, the two departments embody the school's commitment to understand and improve educational practice, information policy, and information systems in a diverse society. Research and doctoral training programs bring together faculties committed to expanding the range of knowledge in education, information science, and associated disciplines. The professional training programs seek to develop librarians, teachers, and administrators within the enriched context of a research university.

Cover page of Mobilizing Records: Reframing Archival Description to Support Human Rights

Mobilizing Records: Reframing Archival Description to Support Human Rights

(2020)

This article seeks to raise consciousness within the field of archival studies in order to foster a generative discussion about how descriptive practices might be expanded, approached differently, or completely rethought. It brings together crosscutting theoretical issues and provides practical examples of mediation in order to mobilize these records in support of human rights work. It first problematizes the foundational archival precept of respect des fonds and its sub-principles of original order and provenance. It then analyzes the necessary transformation of institutional policies and standards in order to foster trust and transparency and identifies structural or system wide strategies for ameliorating past abuses.

Cover page of A telehealth approach to improving clinical trial access for infants with tuberous sclerosis complex.

A telehealth approach to improving clinical trial access for infants with tuberous sclerosis complex.

(2020)

BACKGROUND:Research in rare genetic syndromes associated with ASD is often hampered by the wide geographic distribution of families and the presence of medical comorbidities, such as epilepsy, that may preclude travel to clinical sites. These challenges can limit the sample size and generalizability of the cohorts included in both natural history studies and clinical trials. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare genetic syndrome that confers an elevated risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with social communication delays identified in this population as early as 12 months of age. Early identification of risk necessitates parallel testing of early intervention, prompting the first randomized controlled clinical trial of behavioral intervention for infants with TSC (NCT03422367). However, considerable early recruitment challenges have mandated the systematic identification of enrollment barriers followed by modification of the study design to address these barriers. METHODS:Caregivers were interviewed regarding barriers to enrollment (phase 1). Adaptations to the intervention were made to address these barriers (phase 2). Outcomes based on this modification to the study design were defined by enrollment rate and participant demographics. RESULTS:Qualitative reports from caregivers indicated that distance and time were the primary barriers to clinical trial enrollment. The intervention was then modified to a remote model, with at-home, parent-delivered intervention, and weekly video conferencing with interventionists at the study sites. Enrollment increased 10-fold (from 3 to 30 participants) within 1 year and included a more diverse and clinically representative cohort of infants. CONCLUSION:The design and implementation of more scalable methods to disseminate research remotely can substantially improve access to clinical trials in rare neurodevelopmental disorders. The lessons learned from this trial can serve as a model for future studies not only in rare conditions, but in other populations that lack adequate access, such as families with limited financial or clinical resources. Continued efforts will further refine delivery methods to enhance efficiency and ease of these delivery systems for families.

Cover page of Identifying and Dismantling White Supremacy in Archives: Whole PDF

Identifying and Dismantling White Supremacy in Archives: Whole PDF

(2019)

Full Poster on Identifying and Dismantling White Supremacy in Archives

Cover page of War-weary in the Classroom: A Literature Review on Seeking Justice in Refugee Student Education in Turkey, Jordan, and Lebanon

War-weary in the Classroom: A Literature Review on Seeking Justice in Refugee Student Education in Turkey, Jordan, and Lebanon

(2019)

Children are one of the most affected groups during the Syrian Civil War. They feel the trauma of the war and death of people that they loved, and now, they are suffering from many problems (Gomleksiz & Aslan, 2018). More than half a million Syrian refugee students are not enrolled in school in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon (Culbertson & Constant, 2015). If they are lucky enough to attend school, many education problems are waiting for them such as adapting to a new educational culture, classroom environment, curriculum and language problems. Before these problems are solved, many of them are expected to engage in the classroom and be graded on the same level as native students (Emin, 2016). To provide a better and fairer learning environment in classrooms, comparative studies on refugee education across national contexts should be conducted (Ficarra, 2017). Since Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan struggle with similar issues, a comparative study about the fairness problems such as expectations of academic achievement, school discipline and other forms of inequity that Syrian refugee students experience in classroom can potentially offer solutions to these problems facing educators and policy-makers. Accordingly, this literature review will be conducted to compare studies about these areas. This literature review investigates the following question: How is the equality between refugees and native students especially in mixed classes provided during assessments of students’ academic achievement in Turkey, Jordan, and Lebanon?A big gap is found related to this research question in the literature. Major problems that should be solved to create equality in the mixed classes in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon have been determined such as financial, political, and educational issues in this literature review.