Two-scale structure for giant field enhancement: combination of Rayleigh anomaly and colloidal plasmonic resonance
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Two-scale structure for giant field enhancement: combination of Rayleigh anomaly and colloidal plasmonic resonance

  • Author(s): Darvishzadeh-Varcheie, M
  • Thrift, WJ
  • Kamandi, M
  • Ragan, R
  • Capolino, F
  • et al.
Abstract

We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a two-scale architecture able to achieve giant field enhancement by simultaneously exploiting both the Rayleigh anomaly and localized surface plasmon resonance. Metallic oligomers composed of colloidal nanospheres are well-known for the ability to strongly enhance the near-field at their plasmonic resonance. However, due to intrinsic nonlocality of the dielectric response of the metals along with their inherent loss, the achievable field enhancement has an ultimate constraint. In this paper we demonstrate that combining plasmonic resonance enhancements from oligomers, with feature size of tens of nanometers, with a Rayleigh anomaly caused by a 1-D set of periodic nanorods, having a period on the order of the excitation wavelength, provides a mean to produce enhancement beyond that constrained by losses in near field resonances. Metallic oligomers are chemically assembled in between the periodic set of nanorods that are fabricated using lithographic methods. The nanorod periodicity is investigated to induce the Rayleigh anomaly at the oligomers plasmonic resonance wavelength to further enhance the field in the oligomers hot spots. A thorough study of this structure is carried out by using an effective analytical-numerical model which is also compared to full-wave simulation results. Experimental results comparing enhancements in surface enhanced Raman scattering measurements with and without nanorods demonstrate the effectiveness of a Rayleigh anomaly in boosting the field enhancement. The proposed structure is expected to be beneficial for many applications ranging from medical diagnostics to sensors and solar cells.

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