Initial clinical experience with frameless optically guided stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy in pediatric patients
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Initial clinical experience with frameless optically guided stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy in pediatric patients

  • Author(s): Keshavarzi, Sassan
  • Meltzer, Hal
  • Ben-Haim, Sharona
  • Benjamin Newman, Charles
  • D Lawson, Joshua
  • Levy, Michael L.
  • Murphy, Kevin
  • et al.
Abstract

The objective of this study is to report our initial experience treating pediatric patients with central nervous system tumors using a frameless, optically guided linear accelerator. Pediatric patients were selected for treatment after evaluation by a multidisciplinary neuro-oncology team including neurosurgery, neurology, pathology, oncology, and radiation oncology. Prior to treatment, all patients underwent treatment planning using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and treatment simulation on a standard computed tomography scanner (CT). For CT simulation, patients were fitted with a customized plastic face mask with a bite block attached to an optical array with four reflective markers. After ensuring adequate reproducibility, these markers were tracked during treatment by an infra-red camera. All treatments were delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The follow-up period ranges from 1–18 months, with a median follow-up of 6 months. Nine patients, ages ranging from 12 to 19 years old (median age 15 years old), with a variety of tumors have been treated. Patients were treated for juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA; n = 2), pontine low-grade astrocytoma (n = 1), pituitary adenoma (n = 3), metastatic medulloblastoma (n = 1), acoustic neuroma (n = 1), and pineocytoma (n = 1). We followed patients for a median of 12 months (range 3–18 months) with no in-field failures and were able to obtain encouraging toxicity profiles. Frameless stereotactic optically guided radiosurgery and radiotherapy provides a feasible and accurate tool to treat a number of benign and malignant tumors in children with minimal treatment-related morbidity.

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