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Combined TP53 mutation/3p loss correlates with decreased radiosensitivity and increased matrix-metalloproteinase activity in head and neck carcinoma.

  • Author(s): Raju, Sharat C
  • Hauff, Samantha J
  • Lemieux, Aaron J
  • Orosco, Ryan K
  • Gross, Andrew M
  • Nguyen, Linda T
  • Savariar, Elamprakash
  • Moss, William
  • Whitney, Michael
  • Cohen, Ezra E
  • Lippman, Scott M
  • Tsien, Roger Y
  • Ideker, Trey
  • Advani, Sunil J
  • Nguyen, Quyen T
  • et al.
Abstract

Objective

Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) containing TP53 mutation and 3p deletion ("double-hit") have poorer prognosis compared to patients with either event alone ("single-hit"). The etiology for worse clinical outcomes in patients with "double-hit" cancers is unclear. We compared radiosensitivity of cell lines containing both TP53 mutations and deletion of Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT, the gene most commonly associated with 3p deletion) to "single-hit" lines with only TP53 mutation. We compared radiosensitivity in a "single-hit" cell line with TP53 mutation converted to "double-hit" using RNA interference targeting FHIT. Finally, we compared matrixmetalloproteinase-2/9 (MMP-2/9) activity, a previously-established biomarker for tumor aggressiveness, in xenograft tumors derived from these cell lines.

Materials/methods

TP53 mutation and FHIT deletion profiles of HNSCC lines were established using Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). We used RNA-interference to convert a "single-hit" cell line (SCC4) to "double-hit". Cultured cells were examined for radiosensitivity and cisplatin sensitivity. MMP-2/9 activity was evaluated in "double-hit" versus "single-hit" tumors using ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptide (RACPP) in tongue (n=17) and flank xenografts (n=4).

Results

Radiotherapy caused greater double-stranded DNA breaks in "single-hit" vs naturally occurring and engineered "double-hit" cells. In-vivo, "double-hit" xenografts demonstrated higher MMP-2/9 activity compared to "single-hit" xenografts (p<0.01). There was no difference in cisplatin sensitivity between the cell lines.

Conclusions

TP53 mutation combined with FHIT deletion correlates with decreased radiosensitivity in HNC cell lines. Xenograft from "double-hit" cells exhibit increased MMP-2/9 activity. These findings may in part account for the worse clinical outcome seen in patients with HNSCC "double-hit" tumors.

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