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Exploring factors related to non-adherence to exergaming in patients with chronic heart failure.

  • Author(s): Jaarsma, Tiny;
  • Klompstra, Leonie;
  • Strömberg, Anna;
  • Ben Gal, Tuvia;
  • Mårtensson, Jan;
  • van der Wal, Martje HL;
  • HF‐Wii study team
  • et al.
Abstract

Aims

This study aimed to explore factors related to non-adherence to exergaming in patients with heart failure.

Methods and results

Data from patients in the exergame group in the HF-Wii trial were used. Adherence to exergaming was defined as playing 80% or more of the recommended time. Data on adherence and reasons for not exergaming at all were collected during phone calls after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Logistic regression was performed between patients who were adherent and patients who were non-adherent. Secondly, a logistic regression was performed between patients who not exergamed at all and patients who were adherent to exergaming. Finally, we analysed the reasons for not exergaming at all with manifest content analysis. Almost half of the patients were adherent to exergaming. Patients who were adherent had lower social motivation [odds ratio (OR) 0.072; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.054-0.095], fewer sleeping problems (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.76-0.092), and higher exercise capacity (OR 1.003; 95% CI 1.001-1.005) compared with patients who were non-adherent. Patients who not exergamed at all had lower cognition (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.06-1.31) and more often suffered from peripheral vascular disease (OR 3.74; 95% CI 1.01-13.83) compared with patients who were adherent to exergaming. Patients most often cited disease-specific barriers as a reason for not exergaming at all.

Conclusions

A thorough baseline assessment of physical function and cognition is needed before beginning an exergame intervention. It is important to offer the possibility to exergame with others, to be able to adapt the intensity of physical activity.

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