Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

UC San Diego

UC San Diego Previously Published Works bannerUC San Diego

Near- and Extended-Edge X-Ray-Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy Using Ultrafast Coherent High-Order Harmonic Supercontinua.

  • Author(s): Popmintchev, Dimitar;
  • Galloway, Benjamin R;
  • Chen, Ming-Chang;
  • Dollar, Franklin;
  • Mancuso, Christopher A;
  • Hankla, Amelia;
  • Miaja-Avila, Luis;
  • O'Neil, Galen;
  • Shaw, Justin M;
  • Fan, Guangyu;
  • Ališauskas, Skirmantas;
  • Andriukaitis, Giedrius;
  • Balčiunas, Tadas;
  • Mücke, Oliver D;
  • Pugzlys, Audrius;
  • Baltuška, Andrius;
  • Kapteyn, Henry C;
  • Popmintchev, Tenio;
  • Murnane, Margaret M
  • et al.
Abstract

Recent advances in high-order harmonic generation have made it possible to use a tabletop-scale setup to produce spatially and temporally coherent beams of light with bandwidth spanning 12 octaves, from the ultraviolet up to x-ray photon energies >1.6  keV. Here we demonstrate the use of this light for x-ray-absorption spectroscopy at the K- and L-absorption edges of solids at photon energies near 1 keV. We also report x-ray-absorption spectroscopy in the water window spectral region (284-543 eV) using a high flux high-order harmonic generation x-ray supercontinuum with 10^{9}  photons/s in 1% bandwidth, 3 orders of magnitude larger than has previously been possible using tabletop sources. Since this x-ray radiation emerges as a single attosecond-to-femtosecond pulse with peak brightness exceeding 10^{26}  photons/s/mrad^{2}/mm^{2}/1% bandwidth, these novel coherent x-ray sources are ideal for probing the fastest molecular and materials processes on femtosecond-to-attosecond time scales and picometer length scales.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
For improved accessibility of PDF content, download the file to your device.
Current View