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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Manipulating the Transition Dipole Moment of CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals for Superior Optical Properties.

  • Author(s): Jurow, Matthew J
  • Morgenstern, Thomas
  • Eisler, Carissa
  • Kang, Jun
  • Penzo, Erika
  • Do, Mai
  • Engelmayer, Manuel
  • Osowiecki, Wojciech T
  • Bekenstein, Yehonadav
  • Tassone, Christopher
  • Wang, Lin-Wang
  • Alivisatos, A Paul
  • Brütting, Wolfgang
  • Liu, Yi
  • et al.
Abstract

Colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals exhibit unique photophysical properties including high quantum yields, tunable emission colors, and narrow photoluminescence spectra that have marked them as promising light emitters for applications in diverse photonic devices. Randomly oriented transition dipole moments have limited the light outcoupling efficiency of all isotropic light sources, including perovskites. In this report we design and synthesize deep blue emitting, quantum confined, perovskite nanoplates and analyze their optical properties by combining angular emission measurements with back focal plane imaging and correlating the results with physical characterization. By reducing the dimensions of the nanocrystals and depositing them face down onto a substrate by spin coating, we orient the average transition dipole moment of films into the plane of the substrate and improve the emission properties for light emitting applications. We then exploit the sensitivity of the perovskite electronic transitions to the dielectric environment at the interface between the crystal and their surroundings to reduce the angle between the average transition dipole moment and the surface to only 14° and maximize potential light emission efficiency. This tunability of the electronic transition that governs light emission in perovskites is unique and, coupled with their excellent photophysical properties, introduces a valuable method to extend the efficiencies and applications of perovskite based photonic devices beyond those based on current materials.

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