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Disclosure of complementary health approaches among low income and racially diverse safety net patients with diabetes

  • Author(s): Chao, MT
  • Chao, MT
  • Handley, MA
  • Handley, MA
  • Handley, MA
  • Quan, J
  • Quan, J
  • Sarkar, U
  • Sarkar, U
  • Ratanawongsa, N
  • Ratanawongsa, N
  • Schillinger, D
  • Schillinger, D
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609248/
No data is associated with this publication.
Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective: Patient-provider communication about complementary health approaches can support diabetes self-management by minimizing risk and optimizing care. We sought to identify sociodemographic and communication factors associated with disclosure of complementary health approaches to providers by low-income patients with diabetes. Methods: We used data from San Francisco Health Plan's SMARTSteps Program, a trial of diabetes self-management support for low-income patients (n = 278) through multilingual automated telephone support. Interviews collected use and disclosure of complementary health approaches in the prior month, patient-physician language concordance, and quality of communication. Results: Among racially, linguistically diverse participants, half (47.8%) reported using complementary health practices (n = 133), of whom 55.3% disclosed use to providers. Age, sex, race/ethnicity, nativity, education, income, and health literacy were not associated with disclosure. In adjusted analyses, disclosure was associated with language concordance (AOR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.05, 4.67), physicians' interpersonal communication scores (AOR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.19), shared decision making (AOR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.33, 2.29), and explanatory-type communication (AOR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.09). Conclusion: Safety net patients with diabetes commonly use complementary health approaches and disclose to providers with higher patient-rated quality of communication. Practice implications: Patient-provider language concordance and patient-centered communication can facilitate disclosure of complementary health approaches.

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