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Battery Management Converter System and Multilevel Converter Topology and Control

  • Author(s): Naderi, Roozbeh
  • Advisor(s): Smedley, Keyue
  • et al.
Abstract

Part I: Battery Management Converter System

Energy storage devices such as rechargeable batteries play a significant role in domestic, transportation, and industrial applications. The development of new battery technologies featuring high power and energy densities along with the strict safety, reliability, and lifetime requirements of the applications have brought the need for Battery Management Systems (BMSs). The first part of this thesis, is focused on a configuration called Battery Management Converter System (BMCS) that provides potential advantages over the conventional configurations such as lower cost and power loss and improved reliability and waveform quality. The balancing algorithm and grid connection control of such configuration for grid connected energy storage application has also been studied and developed in this part.

Part II: Multilevel Converter Topology and Control

Multilevel converters are the state-of-the-art power conversion systems for Medium Voltage (MV) high power applications. As MV drives for fans, pumps, mills, compressors, conveyors etc., multilevel converters have found their use in numerous industries such as mining, marine, metals, water, oil and gas, pulp and paper to name a few. As grid-connected inverters, multilevel converters are used to integrate renewable energy sources and energy storage systems into the grid and regulate the power flow and quality. In the second part of this thesis, the focus will be on the five-level converter topologies with a common dc-link as this feature suits them for many applications involving bidirectional flow of energy. New hybrid multilevel converter topologies along with control and modulation techniques are investigated and developed in this part. Improved trade off between cost and reliability and decreased converter loss are the advantages of the developed topologies and modulation techniques.

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