Type Ia supernova science 2010-2020
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Type Ia supernova science 2010-2020

  • Author(s): Howell, DA
  • Conley, A
  • Valle, M Della
  • Nugent, PE
  • Perlmutter, S
  • Marion, GH
  • Krisciunas, K
  • Badenes, C
  • Mazzali, P
  • Aldering, G
  • Antilogus, P
  • Baron, E
  • Becker, A
  • Baltay, C
  • Benetti, S
  • Blondin, S
  • Branch, D
  • Brown, EF
  • Deustua, S
  • Ealet, A
  • Ellis, RS
  • Fouchez, D
  • Freedman, W
  • Gal-Yam, A
  • Jha, S
  • Kasen, D
  • Kessler, R
  • Kim, AG
  • Leonard, DC
  • Li, W
  • Livio, M
  • Maoz, D
  • Mannucci, F
  • Matheson, T
  • Neill, JD
  • Nomoto, K
  • Panagia, N
  • Perrett, K
  • Phillips, M
  • Poznanski, D
  • Quimby, R
  • Rest, A
  • Riess, A
  • Sako, M
  • Soderberg, AM
  • Strolger, L
  • Thomas, R
  • Turatto, M
  • Dyk, S van
  • Wood-Vasey, WM
  • et al.
Abstract

In the next decade Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) will be used to test theories predicting changes in the Dark Energy equation of state with time. Ultimately this requires a dedicated space mission like JDEM. SNe Ia are mature cosmological probes --- their limitations are well characterized, and a path to improvement is clear. Dominant systematic errors include photometric calibration, selection effects, reddening, and population-dependent differences. Building on past lessons, well-controlled new surveys are poised to make strides in these areas: the Palomar Transient Factory, Skymapper, La Silla QUEST, Pan-STARRS, the Dark Energy Survey, LSST, and JDEM. They will obviate historical calibrations and selection biases, and allow comparisons via large subsamples. Some systematics follow from our ignorance of SN Ia progenitors, which there is hope of determining with SN Ia rate studies from 0

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