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Nonossifying Fibromas: A Computed Tomography-based Criteria to Predict Fracture Risk.

Abstract

Background

Nonossifying fibroma (NOF) is the most common benign osseous lesion in children; however, our understanding of which lesions progress to a fracture remains unclear. In this study, we seek to formulate a classification system for NOFs to assess for fracture risk and determine what this classification system tells us regarding fracture risk of the distal tibia and distal femur NOFs.

Methods

Charts were retrospectively reviewed for patients with NOFs. A 4-point criteria was created and used to calculate fracture risk for distal tibia and distal femur NOFs. The analysis included incidence, specificity, and sensitivity.

Results

One point was given for each of the following findings on computed tomography (CT) scan: (1) >50% width on coronal view; (2) >50% width on sagittal view; (3) any cortical breach; (4) lack of a neocortex. In total, 34 patients with NOFs of the distal tibia had CT scans, of which 14 fractured. Zero with a 0- or 1-point score fractured, 2 with a 2-point score fractured (20%), 4 with a 3-point score fractured (44%), and 8 with a 4-point score fractured (100%). Sensitivities of 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-point scores were 100%, 100%, 85.7%, and 57.1%, respectively, and specificities were 71.4%, 71.4%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. A total of 41 patients with NOFs of the distal femur had CT scans, of which 5 fractured. Zero with a 0-point score fractured, 1 with a 1-point score fractured (4%), 0 with a 2-point score fractured, 1 with a 3-point score fractured (20%), and 3 with a 4-point score fractured (100%). Sensitivities of 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-point scores were 100%, 80%, 80%, and 60%, respectively; and specificities were 60%, 87.8%, 90%, and 100%, respectively.

Conclusions

Our 4-point CT criteria is easy to apply and identifies patients at high risk of fracture, helping surgeons make decisions regarding treatment.

Level of evidence

Level IV-prognostic study.

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