Skip to main content
eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

Double-Blind Randomized 12-Month Soy Intervention Had No Effects on Breast MRI Fibroglandular Tissue Density or Mammographic Density.

  • Author(s): Wu, Anna H
  • Spicer, Darcy
  • Garcia, Agustin
  • Tseng, Chiu-Chen
  • Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda
  • Sheth, Pulin
  • Martin, Sue Ellen
  • Hawes, Debra
  • Russell, Christy
  • MacDonald, Heather
  • Tripathy, Debu
  • Su, Min-Ying
  • Ursin, Giske
  • Pike, Malcolm C
  • et al.
Abstract

Soy supplementation by patients with breast cancer remains controversial. No controlled intervention studies have investigated the effects of soy supplementation on mammographic density in patients with breast cancer. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study in previously treated patients with breast cancer (n = 66) and high-risk women (n = 29). We obtained digital mammograms and breast MRI scans at baseline and after 12 months of daily soy (50 mg isoflavones per day; n = 46) or placebo (n = 49) tablet supplementation. The total breast area (MA) and the area of mammographic density (MD) on the mammogram were measured using a validated computer-assisted method, and mammographic density percent (MD% = 100 × MD/MA) was determined. A well-tested computer algorithm was used to quantitatively measure the total breast volume (TBV) and fibroglandular tissue volume (FGV) on the breast MRI, and the FGV percent (FGV% = 100 × FGV/TBV) was calculated. On the basis of plasma soy isoflavone levels, compliance was excellent. Small decreases in MD% measured by the ratios of month 12 to baseline levels were seen in the soy (0.95) and the placebo (0.87) groups; these changes did not differ between the treatments (P = 0.38). Small decreases in FGV% were also found in both the soy (0.90) and the placebo (0.92) groups; these changes also did not differ between the treatments (P = 0.48). Results were comparable in patients with breast cancer and high-risk women. We found no evidence that soy supplementation would decrease mammographic density and that MRI might be more sensitive to changes in density than mammography.

Many UC-authored scholarly publications are freely available on this site because of the UC's open access policies. Let us know how this access is important for you.

Main Content
Current View