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Open Access Publications from the University of California

Parks Stewardship Forum

UC Berkeley

Submission Guidelines


Parks Stewardship Forum

The Interdisciplinary Journal of Place-Based Conservation

Guidelines for Submissions

We welcome proposals for three departments of the journal: full-length articles for “New Perspectives” (which undergo an internal PSF editorial review) and “Advances in Research and Management” (which undergo double-blind external peer review), and visual essays for “The Photographer’s Frame” (reviewed by the journal’s Photo Editors). Instructions for submissions are later in this document. We also welcome proposals for sets of theme papers; contact the editors at psf@georgewright.org for more information.

INTRODUCTION

Purpose of the journal

Parks Stewardship Forum delivers interdisciplinary information and problem-solving techniques across all topics relevant to the world’s parks, protected and conserved areas, cultural sites, and other forms of place-based conservation. The journal represents all areas of inquiry relevant to understanding and management of these places, including but not limited to the natural sciences, cultural resources- related disciplines, social sciences, and interdisciplinary perspectives. Parks Stewardship Forum includes research and scholarship in all these areas, as well as in the areas of governance, management practice, and conservation theory and history.

Editorial goals

We believe that effective place-based conservation requires thinking that goes beyond the horizons of a single specialty or discipline. Parks Stewardship Forum is all about making connections: among different ways of thinking, different ways of acting, and different ways of engaging the public. We are especially interested in submissions that:

  • Spotlight multidisciplinary problem-solving techniques and results as pertain to parks, protected and conserved areas, cultural and community-valued sites, and other effective measures for protecting and conserving special places.
  • Explicitly link research understanding with management action. We want to highlight leading- edge conservation scholarship from the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and other knowledge systems whose findings are immediately useful to, and usable by, managers on the ground.
  • Connect place-based heritage conservation with broader issues such as climate change mitigation and adaptation, public health, education, jobs, Indigenous sovereignty, and environmental justice.
  • Take a strong point of view, clearly articulated and backed by rigorous thinking.

Parks Stewardship Forum is edited by a team convened by the co-publishers, UC Berkeley’s Institute for Parks, People, and Biodiversity and the George Wright Society, overseen by an Editorial Board appointed by the co-publishers.

Open-access publishing

Parks Stewardship Forumis an open-access journal published digitally on the University of California’s eScholarship platform at https://escholarship.org/uc/psf. An interactive version of the journal is also available at https://parks.berkeley.edu/psf.

Open-access publishing serves the missions of the Institute for Parks, People, and Biodiversity and the George Wright Society to share, freely and broadly, research and knowledge produced by and for those who manage parks, protected and conserved areas, and cultural sites throughout the world.

Copyright matters

All original material published in Parks Stewardship Forum is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Authors retain their copyright. More information about this license is available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

Author’s agreement

The author (or corresponding author in instances where submissions have co-authors) must sign a standard Author’s Agreement before the submission can be published.

DOIs required wherever possible

Most submissions to Parks Stewardship Forum include endnotes or a list of references (or both). When you cite a source (such as an article, a report, a book, or some other document) that is published on the web, you must list its Digital Object Identifier (DOI) as part of the endnote or reference—if the source has one.

A DOI is a string of numbers, letters, and symbols used to permanently identify an article or document and link to it on the web. It is a permanent URL (web address) for an individual article or document that is published online. DOIs are considered a more stable way of linking to web-published content than standard URLs, which can change or disappear.

  • A standard URL looks something like this: https://agency.gov/draft_report.pdf
  • A DOI for that same document looks something like this: https://doi.org/10.1037/dmh0000014

Use of DOIs is now standard in journal publishing, and every article in Parks Stewardship Forum is assigned a DOI by the University of California Digital Library. In turn, as noted above the papers we publish in Parks Stewardship Forum are required to provide DOIs for citations of web-published materials wherever possible. As a prospective author, this means you must:

  • Review your endnotes and/or list of references and, for any source for which you are citing a standard URL, check to see if it also has a DOI.
  • The easiest way to check is to go to the source via the standard URL. If the source has a DOI, it will often be listed there. You can also search for DOIs at https://www.crossref.org/guestquery/.
  • If you find a DOI, list it instead of the standard URL. Otherwise, keep the standard URL.

Plagiarism screening

As a standard best practice in publishing, all material submitted to Parks Stewardship Forum is screened for plagiarism prior to acceptance.

SUBMISSION OPTIONS

We welcome proposals for three departments of the journal: full-length articles for “New Perspectives” and “Advances in Research and Management,” and visual essays for “The Photographer’s Frame.”

Articles for “New Perspectives” (internal editorial review)

  • Articles submitted to “New Perspectives” are evaluated solely by PSF’s editors.
  • Abstract optional, though strongly encouraged; if submitted, 250 words maximum
  • Article: 2000–4000 words, unless prior arrangements made with editors
  • Up to 5 photos, tables, and figures in combination
  • Up to 10 references
  • No publication fee charged

Submission review process

Articles submitted to “New Perspectives” are reviewed by the journal’s editors to confirm that they advance our purpose and editorial goals (see above) and meet a high standard of organization and written expression. Sometimes the editors will consult with others in their evaluation. We may ask for revisions before rendering a publishing decision. We do our best to give authors an answer within 8 weeks. Accepted papers undergo substantive editing, if deemed necessary, as well as copyediting.

Manuscript preparation

  • Formatting. All manuscripts must be submitted in Microsoft Word. Keep text styling to a minimum. Do not render the title of the paper in all-caps.
  • Author identification. The names, affiliations, complete mailing addresses, and emails of all authors must be given on a separate title page. A single Corresponding Author must be identified, and that person’s mailing address and email given; all communications will go to this person alone. Include a phone number for the Corresponding Author (this is for internal use only and is not published).
  • Citations. Use either the “Notes and Bibliography” or “Author-Date” style, as appropriate to your field/topic, as described in the most recent edition of The Chicago Manual of Style: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_ citationguide.html. As explained above, you must supply Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for those sources that have them. See the end of these guidelines for samples of both citation styles.
  • Tables must be in Word or Excel and not exceed 400 words.
  • Photos and other graphics must be in .tif, .jpg, or .png format. They must be at a resolution of at least 300 ppi when sized at approximately 480 pixels (5 inches/15 cm) wide. A separate Word document with captions must be submitted, with attributions and permissions as needed. Rough rule of thumb: if the file size of your image is 1 Mb or larger, it probably meets our resolution requirements.

Articles for “Advances in Research and Management” (external peer review)

Articles submitted to “Advances in Research and Management” undergo peer review by two referees.

  • Abstract required: 250 words maximum
  • Article: 3000–5000 words, unless prior arrangements made with editors
  • Up to 10 photos, tables, and figures in combination
  • Up to 25 references
  • A publication fee of US$100 is charged for accepted peer-reviewed articles to help defray editorial costs (there is no charge unless the article is accepted; this fee is waived if the author or any of the co-authors is a GWS member or a faculty member at any branch of the University of California system, and may be waived on a needs basis for authors from developing countries)

Submission review process

Articles submitted to PSF’s “Advances in Research and Management” undergo a double-blind peer review process (the authors and reviewers remain anonymous to one another). Two affirmative reviews are required for acceptance. PSF’s editors work with authors to respond to requests for revisions.

Accepted papers undergo copyediting. We ask reviewers to respond within 6 weeks, but the overall process, which might involve revisions and a second round of review, can take several months.

Manuscript preparation

  • Formatting. All manuscripts must be submitted in Microsoft Word. Keep text styling to a minimum. Do not render the title in all-caps.
  • Author identification. The names, affiliations, complete mailing addresses, and emails of all authors must be given on a separate cover page. A single Corresponding Author must be identified, and that person’s mailing address and email given; all communications will go to this person alone. Include a phone number for the Corresponding Author (this is for internal use only and is not published).
  • List of possible peer reviewers. The cover page must also include a list of 6 (six) possible peer reviewers. Give their names, job titles, affiliations, and email addresses. The reviewers cannot be colleagues working in the same park, office, or university department of any of the authors, and cannot be associated with the project(s) being discussed in the paper. PSF’s editors may select reviewers from outside this list.
  • Conflict of interest/funding declaration. Finally, the cover page should also disclose any potential conflicts of interest, or if none exist, so state. All sources of funding should be disclosed. This information will be published if the article is accepted.
  • Preserving anonymity. Take care to make sure the main manuscript doesn’t inadvertently disclose the authors’ identity. Anonymizing the manuscript may involve, for example, redacting the name of the institution with which the authors are affiliated, or redacting other details that might reveal the identity of the authors. Do not include an Acknowledgments section; if one is desired, it can be added after the manuscript is accepted.
  • Citations. Use either the “Notes and Bibliography” or “Author-Date” style, as appropriate to your field/topic, as described in the most recent edition of The Chicago Manual of Style: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_ citationguide.html. As explained above, you must supply Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for those sources that have them. See the end of these guidelines for samples of both citation styles.
  • Tables must be in Word or Excel and not exceed 400 words.
  • Photos and other graphics must be in .tif, .jpg, or .png format. They must be at a resolution of at least 300 ppi when sized at approximately 480 pixels (5 inches/15 cm) wide. A separate Word document with captions must be submitted, with attributions and permissions as needed. Rough rule of thumb:if the file size of your image is 1 Mb or larger, it probably meets our resolution requirements.

“The Photographer’s Frame”: Visual Essays

A regular feature of Parks Stewardship Forum, The Photographer’s Frame provides opportunities to tell compelling, influential, and inspirational stories about protected area stewardship using visual narratives to include and engage diverse audiences. The Photographer’s Frame invites authors to explore non-verbal communication arts to relate knowledge and experience to others. No publication fee is charged.

Ten Tips for Crafting Compelling Visual Essays

  • Create a visual narrative like a map, not a script.
  • Present your story three times: with images, then image titles, and finally captions.
  • Invoke the power of images to make memories that tell your story.
  • Set a scene: establish a sense of place, and introduce the topic so as to engage the audience.
  • Introduce the characters, players, and other key elements of the story.
  • Explore details that characterize the topic/theme, place, and characters.
  • Create dynamic tension (mystery, threat, opportunity) that the story can help resolve.
  • Capture and reveal moments that matter.
  • Wrap up the package, remind audiences why the story is interesting and important.
  • Close the deal—every story has a beginning, middle, and end—provide a memorable end.

Technical Details: Images (photographs)

Create story elements with images: setting, plot, characters, conflict & theme.

Tell a story with:

  • 10–12 total images
  • Minimum resolution: 300 ppi
  • Image dimensions: 1024-2000 pixels wide
  • Maximum file size each image 7 MB (3–5 Mb preferred)
  • Color space: sRGB

Technical Details: Words

  • Essay/Introduction—no more than 500 words to introduce the story
  • Titles—fewer than 10 words for each image to link the images to the story
  • Captions—fewer than 50 words each image to explicate the image content
  • The Essay/Introduction and Captions should be in separate Word files

Examples

  • One Health For All: https://doi.org/10.5070/P537151756
  • Beyond the Scenery: https://doi.org/10.5070/P536248276

Submission review process

Proposals for “The Photographer’s Frame” are reviewed by the journal’s photo editors to confirm that they advance our purpose and editorial goals (see above). Those that are invited for submission will be evaluated to ensure that they meet a high standard of organization, visual excellence, and cogent written expression. Sometimes the editors will consult with others in their evaluation. We may ask for revisions before rendering a publishing decision. We do our best to give authors an answer within 8 weeks. The photographer’s preface and captions undergo substantive editing, if deemed necessary, as well as copyediting. To those who have had a proposal accepted for evaluation, the photo editors will provide separate guidelines on how to create an effective photoessay.

HOW TO PROPOSE A SUBMISSION

Fill out the form at https://www.georgewrightsociety.org/psfsubmissions. The form will assign your submission a unique Reference Number. PSF’s editors will respond, either inviting or declining your proposal.

Where to submit

Once invited, all submissions should be emailed to psf@georgewright.org. Please include the Reference Number in the subject line of the cover message, and include the all the required information (refer to the instructions above) in the body of the cover message. We will acknowledge receipt promptly.

Questions?

If you have questions before you submit a proposal or a manuscript, contact us. We’re glad to help. Contact us at: psf@georgewright.org.

CITATION EXAMPLES: Notes and Bibliography Style

In this style, often used in humanities scholarship, in-text citations are given as Endnotes and citations within the Endnotes are formatted as follows:

Book, single-author [note page numbers being cited are given at end]

Carolyn Finney, Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2014), 177–180.

Book, multi-author or multi-editor [note page numbers being cited are given at end]

John E. Gross, Stephen Woodley, Leigh A. Welling, and James E.M. Watson (eds.), Adapting to Climate Change: Guidance for Protected Area Managers, Best Practice Protected Area Guidelines Series no. 24 (Gland, Switzerland: International Union for Conservation of Nature, 2016), 4–8.

Chapter in edited book [note page numbers being cited are given at end]

Susan Newton, “Place-based Learning Fosters Engagement Opportunities for Innovative Partnerships,” in J.L. Thompson and A.K. Houseal (eds.), America’s Largest Classroom: What We Learn from Our National Parks( Berkeley: University of California Press, 2020), 171–181.

Journal article

Jonathan B. Jarvis, “Designing Climate Resilience for People and Nature at the Landscape Scale,” Parks Stewardship Forum 36(1): 17–18 (2020). https://doi.org/10.5070/P536146408

Newspaper article

Fahrad Manjoo, “I Don’t Know Who Needs to Hear This, but Brands Can’t Save You: America’s Failed Response to the Coronavirus is a Direct Result of Decades of Starving Federal Agencies of Expertise,” New York Times, March 18, 2020. https://nyti.ms/2IVYvQm

Webpage

National Park Service, Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial, “Oliver Hazard Perry.” Accessed May 10, 2020. https://www.nps.gov/pevi/learn/historyculture/perry.htm

CITATION EXAMPLES: Author–Date Style

In this style, which is standard in science scholarship (but available to scholars in the humanities), citations within the References list are formatted as follows:

Book, single-author [note that page numbers are cited in-text rather than in the References list] Finney, C. 2014. Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Book, multi-author or multi-editor [note that page numbers are cited in-text rather than in the References list]

Gross,J.E., S. Woodley, L.A. Welling, and J.E.M. Watson, eds. 2016. Adapting to Climate Change: Guidance for Protected Area Managers. Best Practice Protected Area Guidelines Series no. 24. Gland, Switzerland: International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Chapter in edited book [note that page numbers are cited in-text rather than in the References list] Newton, S. 2020. Place-based learning fosters engagement opportunities for innovative partnerships. In America’s Largest Classroom: What We Learn from Our National Parks, J.L. Thompson and A.K. Houseal, eds. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Journal article

Jarvis, J.B. 2020. Designing climate resilience for people and nature at the landscape scale. Parks Stewardship Forum 36(1): 17–18. https://doi.org/10.5070/P536146408

Newspaper article

Manjoo, F. 2020. I don’t know who needs to hear this, but brands can’t save you: America’s failed response to the coronavirus is a direct result of decades of starving federal agencies of expertise. New York Times, 18 March. https://nyti.ms/2IVYvQm

Webpage

National Park Service, Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial. N.d. Oliver Hazard Perry. https://www.nps.gov/pevi/learn/historyculture/perry.htm(accessed 10 May 2020)

If one happened to be citing all the above sources in a single in-text citation, the formatting would be as follows (note that the order within is chronological, and alphabetical only when there is more than one citation of a source published in the same year):

(Finney 2014: 177–180; Gross et al. 2016: 4–8; Jarvis 2020: 17–18; Newton 2020: 171–181; Manjoo 2020; National Park Service n.d.)