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Cover page of LA Sustainable Water Project: Los Angeles City-Wide Overview

LA Sustainable Water Project: Los Angeles City-Wide Overview

(2018)

This report assesses the potential to improve water quality standards while integrating complementary One Water Management practices that can increase potential local water supplies for the City of Los Angeles (the City).  This final report summarizes the current practices and future opportunities at the City-owned Water Reclamation Plants and underlying groundwater basins and highlights the importance of considering all aspects of integrated water management even when dealing with water quality or supply-focused projects.  

Implementing watershed-scale best management practice programs to meet stormwater permit requirements will significantly improve water quality in all watersheds.  However, additional mechanisms such as increasing Low Impact Development implementation and comprehensive source tracking and source control mechanisms will be required to potentially eliminate water quality exceedances.  There are multiple efforts occurring in the City and the region to increase the recharge of recycled water into the ground and the volumes of remediated groundwater extracted. 

This research further assessed the impacts of potential water supply portfolios, with greater volumes of locally-supplied water, on GHG emissions and energy needs of supplying LA’s water.  Conservation will be another powerful tool to decrease our dependence on imported water.  This research demonstrates the complex interrelationships between all aspects of urban water management, including, for example, stormwater management and local water supply.

Cover page of LA Sustainable Water Project: Los Angeles River Watershed

LA Sustainable Water Project: Los Angeles River Watershed

(2017)

The LA Sustainable Water Project: Los Angeles River Watershed report explores the potential to improve water quality standards while integrating complementary One Water Management practices that can increase potential local water supplies for the City of Los Angeles (the City) in the highly urbanized Los Angeles River (LAR) watershed.To assess the integrated water landscape in this watershed, the report also looks at current practices and future opportunities at the Donald C Tillman, LA Glendale, and Burbank Water Reclamation Plants (WRPs) and in the underlying Upper LA River Area (ULARA) adjudicated groundwater basins. Implementing watershed-scale best management practice programs to meet stormwater permit requirements will significantly improve water quality. However, additional mechanisms such as increasing Low Impact Development implementation and comprehensive source tracking and source control mechanisms will be required to potentially eliminate water quality exceedances. The 3 WRPs in the watershed currently discharge more than 30 million gallons per day of treated wastewater into the River; an increased focus on increasing local water supply could lead to a reduction in these discharges.

The combination of increased stormwater capture and increased use of recycled water in the LAR watershed could lead to lower flows in the LAR and impact habitat and recreational uses; further study is needed to characterize potential impacts and identify optimal flows for the future of the LAR. The City is leading efforts in ULARA to increase the recharge of recycled water into theground by 30,000 acre feet per year and increase the volumes of remediated groundwater extracted by around 120,000 acre feet per year. This research demonstrates the complex interrelationships between all aspects of urban water management, including stormwater management and local water supply.

Cover page of LA Sustainable Water Project: Dominguez Channel & Machado Lake Watersheds

LA Sustainable Water Project: Dominguez Channel & Machado Lake Watersheds

(2017)

This report explores the potential to improve water quality standards while integrating complementary One Water Management practices that can increase potential local-water supplies for the City of Los Angeles (the City) in the highly urbanized Dominguez Channel (DC) and Machado Lake (ML) watersheds.  To assess the integrated water landscape in this watershed, the report also looks at current practices and future opportunities at the Terminal Island Water Reclamation Plant (TIWRP) and in the underlying adjudicated groundwater basins: West Coast Basin and Central Basin.  

Implementing watershed-scale best management practice programs to meet stormwater permit requirements will significantly improve water quality in these watersheds. However, additional mechanisms such as implementing the City’s Low Impact Development ordinance and comprehensive source tracking and source control mechanisms will be required to potentially eliminate water quality exceedances.   

TIWRP currently treats nearly 15 million gallons per day (MGD) of wastewater with advanced-water treatment for reuse; however, sufficient demand exists locally to utilize approximately 25 MGD.  West Coast and Central Basins provide multiple opportunities to increase our local water supply through increasing recharge and extraction in these basins, including 450,000 acre feet of available dewatered space in the basins.  This research demonstrates the complex interrelationships between all aspects of urban water management, including, for example, stormwater management and local water supply.

Cover page of Enhanced PM2.5 pollution in China due to aerosol-cloud interactions

Enhanced PM2.5 pollution in China due to aerosol-cloud interactions

(2017)

Aerosol-cloud interactions (aerosol indirect effects) play an important role in regional meteorological variations, which could further induce feedback on regional air quality. While the impact of aerosol-cloud interactions on meteorology and climate has been extensively studied, their feedback on air quality remains unclear. Using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model, we find that increased aerosol loading due to anthropogenic activities in China substantially increases column cloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path (LWP), which further leads to a reduction in the downward shortwave radiation at surface, surface air temperature and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height. The shallower PBL and accelerated cloud chemistry due to larger LWP in turn enhance the concentrations of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) by up to 33.2 μg m−3 (25.1%) and 11.0 μg m−3 (12.5%) in January and July, respectively. Such a positive feedback amplifies the changes in PM2.5 concentrations, indicating an additional air quality benefit under effective pollution control policies but a penalty for a region with a deterioration in PM2.5 pollution. Additionally, we show that the cloud processing of aerosols, including wet scavenging and cloud chemistry, could also have substantial effects on PM2.5 concentrations.

Cover page of Artes: An Integrated Model of Water Supply in L.A. County

Artes: An Integrated Model of Water Supply in L.A. County

(2017)

Artes is a model of water management in metropolitan Los Angeles. It was developed to investigate the potential for maximizing local water supplies and reducing imports across Los Angeles and its hundreds of water agencies. Model results have helped assess the implications of local water supply on urban water systems reliability, stormwater capture and water reuse, groundwater management, environmental flows, economics, and urban landscapes (trees and plants). The model is a product of the California Center for Sustainable Communities at UCLA and was developed through a collaborative research network spanning UCLA, the University of Utah, and Colorado School of Mines. The project was funded through the National Science Foundation's Water, Sustainability, and Climate program. 

Cover page of 2017 Sustainable LA Environmental Report Card for Los Angeles County: Energy & Air Quality

2017 Sustainable LA Environmental Report Card for Los Angeles County: Energy & Air Quality

(2017)

The 2017 Sustainable LA Environmental Report Card (ERC) for Los Angeles County (LA County) on Energy and Air Quality offers an in-depth look at the region’s sustainability efforts focusing on the energy we use, greenhouse gas emissions, and the air we breathe. The LA County Environmental Report Card is the only comprehensive environmental report card for a megacity in the world. This ERC assesses 21 indicators that fall into five categories: Stationary Energy Use; Transportation; Renewable Energy Resources; Greenhouse Gas Emissions; and Air Quality and Human Health Impacts. A majority of these indicators are entirely new areas of inquiry for the ERC, and together will provide a broader picture of current conditions compared to the 2015 ERC. Grades were assigned in each category based on compliance with environmental laws or numeric standards where applicable, on our best professional judgment, and on historical improvements and context. This year’s grades range from C-/ Incomplete to B, and although there is progress towards meeting local and state goals, and a number of new standards and regulations that will undoubtedly have a positive impact in years to come.

Cover page of 2017 Sustainable LA Environmental Report Card for Los Angeles County: Energy & Air Quality (Infographics)

2017 Sustainable LA Environmental Report Card for Los Angeles County: Energy & Air Quality (Infographics)

(2017)

The 2017 Sustainable LA Environmental Report Card (ERC) for Los Angeles County (LA County) on Energy and Air Quality offers an in-depth look at the region’s sustainability efforts focusing on the energy we use, greenhouse gas emissions, and the air we breathe. The LA County Environmental Report Card is the only comprehensive environmental report card for a megacity in the world. This ERC assesses 21 indicators that fall into five categories: Stationary Energy Use; Transportation; Renewable Energy Resources; Greenhouse Gas Emissions; and Air Quality and Human Health Impacts. A majority of these indicators are entirely new areas of inquiry for the ERC, and together will provide a broader picture of current conditions compared to the 2015 ERC. Grades were assigned in each category based on compliance with environmental laws or numeric standards where applicable, on our best professional judgment, and on historical improvements and context. This year’s grades range from C-/ Incomplete to B, and although there is progress towards meeting local and state goals, and a number of new standards and regulations that will undoubtedly have a positive impact in years to come.

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Cover page of Southern California Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem Roundtable Report

Southern California Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem Roundtable Report

(2016)

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) hosted the Southern California Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem Roundtable discussion on May 10, 2016 on the UCLA campus in Kerckhoff Hall. This roundtable discussion brought together 28 leaders from academia, local and state government, a national laboratory, non-profit groups, and industry to discuss Southern California’s clean energy needs as the state and region transition to meet their ambitious climate and energy goals.

The purpose of this report is to provide the United States Department of Energy (DOE) a comprehensive summary of the roundtable event, and to identify some broad conclusions and next steps for the Southern California region with regard to a clean energy pathway. All of this is being considered within the context of Mission Innovation (http://mission-innovation.net), whose goal is to accelerate innovation in clean energy and to make clean energy affordable around the globe.