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Open Access Publications from the University of California
Cover page of Livestock Protection Tools for California Ranchers

Livestock Protection Tools for California Ranchers

(2018)

Conflicts between livestock and predators are perhaps inevitable, especially on extensively managed rangelands This publication helps producers evaluate livestock lethal and non-lethal protection tools that may fit their site-specific needs.

Cover page of Restoration Manual for Annual Grassland Systems in California

Restoration Manual for Annual Grassland Systems in California

(2017)

Widespread development and massive degradation are quickly eroding the persistence and health of annual grassland systems. This guide was developed to give practitioners of any experience level an overview of considerations for grassland restoration design and application that will be right for their situation. Here you’ll find ways to effectively improve grassland conditions in monetarily and logistically feasible ways. This publication focuses on restoration species choice, because species identity can be the dominant driver of achieving a restoration goal—included is an extensive appendix matching geographic area and soil type to appropriate species for consideration. The techniques presented are the result of years of experience from research scientists and non-academic practitioners and synthesizes published and unpublished data in one handy source. Sections include: Identifying Restoration Goals and Desired Outcomes: Biodiversity Pollinator Habitat Wildlife Habitat Erosion Control Forage for Grazing Animals Carbon Storage/Nutrient Cycling Pre-Vegetation Techniques Plant Materials Revegetation Techniques Discussion of 83 species with brief description of pros and cons Extensive references

Cover page of Distinguishing Johnsongrass and Young Summer Grass Weeds

Distinguishing Johnsongrass and Young Summer Grass Weeds

(2017)

One of the most difficult tasks associated with the management of weedy grasses is accurately identifying the species of an immature plant. Since many grasses look similar when very young, identification to species is key to correctly implementing a weed management program, especially one using herbicides. This guide aids in identifying and distinguishing johnsongrass and other grass species that appear similar when immature, using distribution maps of United States counties where each species has been reported, photographs, and diagnostic characteristics using distribution maps of United States counties where each species has been reported, photographs, and diagnostic characteristics for each species.

Cover page of Biology and Management of Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)

Biology and Management of Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)

(2017)

Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) is a summer perennial grass native to the Mediterranean region. It was introduced to the Southern United States in the early 1800s as a perennial forage crop and is still in use for cattle grazing in many states. After introduction, it escaped cultivation and is now present or naturalized in nearly every state in the continental United States. It is recognized as invasive or as a noxious weed throughout the south, southwest, and west and is one of the ten most troublesome weeds in the world. Learn effective ways to manage infestations.

Cover page of Cattle Management Strategies To Minimize Foothill Abortion

Cattle Management Strategies To Minimize Foothill Abortion

(2016)

A tick-borne bacterial disease, commonly known as foothill abortion, kills cow fetuses and has had a devastating effect on herds grazing in parts of the intermountain West. This publication will help you develop management strategies that minimize the impacts of the disease including whether ticks are present in a pasture (identified by dry ice trapping), the time when ticks are active, and the stage of pregnancy of a heifer or cow when grazing pasture where ticks may be present.

Cover page of Barb Goatgrass and Medusahead: Timing of Grazing and Mowing Treatments

Barb Goatgrass and Medusahead: Timing of Grazing and Mowing Treatments

(2016)

Barb goatgrass and medusahead are invasive annual grasses that have spread or have the potential to spread throughout much of California's annual grasslands. Barb goatgrass is a B-rated noxious weed and medusahead is a C-rated noxious weed in the State of California, meaning that they both cause economic or environmental detriment. Both are prolific seed producers, making management to reduce their abundance possible but eradication difficult and unlikely. This publication gives a thorough description of growth stages of these invasive plants so you can employ the optimum timing of grazing and mowing treatments for management in your situation. Includes color photographs of key growth stages.

Cover page of Rangeland Management Series: Annual Range Forage Production

Rangeland Management Series: Annual Range Forage Production

(2016)

Livestock on California's foothill rangelands get much of their nutrition from rangeland forage plants. An understanding of how climatic factors influence forage productivity can help growers predict the need to provide supplemental feed.

Cover page of Understanding Working Rangelands: A Year in the Life of a Beef Cow

Understanding Working Rangelands: A Year in the Life of a Beef Cow

(2016)

This publication goes right to the source to give you an idea of cattle's place and role on California public-access lands with an account of a year's life, as related by one particularly eloquent beef cow.

Cover page of Caring for Cattle to Provide Safe and Wholesome Meat

Caring for Cattle to Provide Safe and Wholesome Meat

(2015)

The care and feeding of livestock has a cyclic rhythm tied to the animals' reproductive cycle and seasonal health needs. Ranchers must perform numerous tasks to keep their animals healthy and reproducing. This publication covers a variety of common tasks and their typical timing; referred to by ranchers as “working” cattle or sheep.

Cover page of The Benefits of Grazing—Livestock Grazing: A Conservation Tool on California's Annual Grasslands.

The Benefits of Grazing—Livestock Grazing: A Conservation Tool on California's Annual Grasslands.

(2015)

Grazing livestock do a lot more than just fill their bellies with wild grasses. Their grazing also helps keep potential wildfire fuels in check and enhances habitat opportunities for native plants, birds, frogs, salamanders, and more. Read all about it!