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Open Access Publications from the University of California

iPRES 2009: the Sixth International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects

The California Digital Library supports the assembly and creative use of the world's scholarship and knowledge for the University of California libraries and the communities they serve.

In addition, the CDL provides tools that support the construction of online information services for research, teaching, and learning, including services that enable the UC libraries to effectively share their materials and provide greater access to digital content.

Cover page of Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

(2009)

The Danish Ministry of Culture is currently funding a project to set up a model for costing preservation of digital materials held by national cultural heritage institutions. The overall objective of the project is to provide a basis for comparing and estimating future financial requirements for digital preservation and to increase cost effectiveness of digital preservation activities. In this study we describe an activity based costing methodology for digital preservation based on the OAIS Reference Model. In order to estimate the cost of digital migrations we have identified cost critical activities by analysing the OAIS Model, and supplemented this analysis with findings from other models, literature and own experience. To verify the model it has been tested on two sets of data from a normalisation project and a migration project at the Danish National Archives. The study found that the OAIS model provides a sound overall framework for cost breakdown, but that some functions, especially when it comes to performing and evaluating the actual migration, need additional detailing in order to cost activities accurately.

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Cover page of LIFE3: Predicting Long Term Digital Preservation Costs

LIFE3: Predicting Long Term Digital Preservation Costs

(2009)

This paper will provide an overview of developments from the two phases of the LIFE (Lifecycle Information for E-Literature) project, LIFE1 and LIFE2, before describing the aims and latest progress from the third phase. Emphasis will be placed on the various approaches to estimate preservation costs including the use of templates to facilitate user interaction with the costing tool. The paper will also explore how the results of the Project will help to inform preservation planning and collection management decisions with a discussion of scenarios in which the LIFE costing tool could be applied. This will be supported by a description of how adopting institutions are already utilising LIFE tools and techniques to analyse and refine their existing preservation activity as well as to enhance their collection management decision making.

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Cover page of ArchivePress: A Really Simple Solution to Archiving Blog Content

ArchivePress: A Really Simple Solution to Archiving Blog Content

(2009)

Blog archiving and preservation is not a new challenge. Current solutions are commonly based on typical web archiving activities, whereby a crawler is configured to harvest a copy of the blog and return the copy to a web archive. Yet this is not the only solution, nor is it always the most appropriate. We propose that in some cases, an approach building on the functionality provided by web feeds offers more potential. This paper describes research to develop such an approach, suitable for organisations of varying size and which can be implemented with relatively little resource and technical know-how: the ArchivePress project.

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Cover page of Where the Semantic Web and Web 2.0 Meet Format Risk Management: P2 Registry

Where the Semantic Web and Web 2.0 Meet Format Risk Management: P2 Registry

(2009)

The Web is increasingly becoming a platform for linked data. This means making connections and adding value to data on the Web. As more data becomes openly available and more people are able to use the data, it becomes more powerful. An example is file format registries and the evaluation of format risks. Here the requirement for information is now greater than the effort that any single institution can put into gathering and collating this information. Recognising that more is better, the creators of PRONOM, JHOVE, GDFR and others are joining to lead a new initiative, the Unified Digital Format Registry. Ahead of this effort a new RDF-based framework for structuring and facilitating file format data from multiple sources including PRONOM has demonstrated it is able to produce more links, and thus provide more answers to digital preservation questions - about format risks, applications, viewers and transformations - than the native data alone. This paper will describe this registry, P2, and its services, show how it can be used, and provide examples where it delivers more answers than the contributing resources.

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Cover page of An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

(2009)

In order better to meet the needs of its diverse University of California constituencies, the California Digital Library UC Curation Center is re-envisioning its approach to digital curation infrastructure by devolving function into a set of granular, independent, but interoperable micro-services. Since each of these services is small and self-contained, they are more easily developed, deployed, maintained, and enhanced; at the same time, complex curation function can emerge from the strategic combination of atomistic services. The emergent approach emphasizes the persistence of content rather than the systems in which that management occurs, thus the paradigmatic archival culture is not unduly coupled to any particular technological context. This results in a curation environment that is comprehensive in scope, yet flexible with regard to local policies and practices and sustainable despite the inevitability of disruptive change in technology and user expectation.

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Cover page of A Translation Layer to Convey Preservation Metadata

A Translation Layer to Convey Preservation Metadata

(2009)

The long term preservation is a responsibility to share with other organizations, even adopting different preservation methods and tools. The overcoming of the interoperability issues, by means of the achievement of a flawless exchange of digital assets to preserve, enables the feasibility of applying distributed digital preservation policies. The Archives Ready To AIP Transmission a PREMIS Based Project (ARTAT-PBP) aims to experiment with the adoption of a common preservation metadata standard as interchange language in a network of cooperating organizations that need to exchange digital resources with the mutual objective of preserving them in the long term.

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Cover page of Are You Ready? Assessing Whether Organisations are Prepared for Digital Preservation

Are You Ready? Assessing Whether Organisations are Prepared for Digital Preservation

(2009)

In the last few years digital preservation has started to transition from a theoretical discipline to one where real solutions are beginning to be used. The Planets project has analyzed the readiness of libraries, archives and related organizations to begin to use the outputs of various digital preservation initiatives (and, in particular, the outputs of the Planets project). This talk will discuss the outcomes of this exercise which have revealed an increasing understanding the problem. It has also shown concerns about its scale (in terms of data volumes and types of data) and on the maturity of existing solutions (most people are only aware of piecemeal solutions). It also shows that there is a new challenge emerging: moving from running digital preservation projects to embedding the processes within their organisations.

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Cover page of Into the Archive: Potential and Limits of Standardizing the Ingest

Into the Archive: Potential and Limits of Standardizing the Ingest

(2009)

The ingest and its preparation are crucial steps and of strategical importance for digital preservation. If we want to move digital preservation into the mainstream we have to make them as easy as possible. The aim of the NESTOR guide "Into The Archive" is to help streamlining the planning and execution of ingest projects. The main challenge for such a guide is to provide help for a broad audience with heterogeneous use cases and without detailed background knowledge on the producer side. This paper will introduce the guide, present first experiences and discuss the challenges.

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Cover page of The National Digital Stewardship Alliance Charter: Enabling Collaboration to Achieve National Digital Preservation

The National Digital Stewardship Alliance Charter: Enabling Collaboration to Achieve National Digital Preservation

(2009)

The Library of Congress proposes extending the success of the NDIIPP (National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program) network by forming a national stewardship alliance of committed digital preservation partners.

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Cover page of Digital Archeology: Recovering Digital Objects from Audio Waveforms

Digital Archeology: Recovering Digital Objects from Audio Waveforms

(2009)

Specimens of early computer systems stop working every day. One storage medium that was popular for home computers in the 1980s was the audio tape. The first home computer systems allowed the use of standard cassette players to record and replay data. Audio tapes are more durable than old home computers when properly stored. Devices playing this medium (i.e. tape recorders) can be found in working condition or can be repaired as they are made out of standard components. By re-engineering the format of the waveform the data on such media can then be extracted from a digitized audio stream. This work presents a case study of extracting data created on an early home computer system, the Philips G7400. Results show that with some error correction methods parts of the tapes are still readable, even without the original system. It also becomes clear, that it is easier to build solutions now when the original systems are still available.

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