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Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of high LDL cholesterol in New York City, 2004.

  • Author(s): Upadhyay, Ushma D
  • Waddell, Elizabeth Needham
  • Young, Stephanie
  • Kerker, Bonnie D
  • Berger, Magdalena
  • Matte, Thomas
  • Angell, Sonia Y
  • et al.
Abstract

INTRODUCTION:Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a major contributor to coronary heart disease and the primary target of cholesterol-lowering therapy. Substantial disparities in cholesterol control exist nationally, but it is unclear how these patterns vary locally. METHODS:We estimated the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of high LDL cholesterol using data from a unique local survey of New York City's diverse population. The New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2004 was administered to a probability sample of New York City adults. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 was used for comparison. High LDL cholesterol and coronary heart disease risk were defined using National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines. RESULTS:Mean LDL cholesterol levels in New York City and nationally were similar. In New York City, 28% of adults had high LDL cholesterol, 71% of whom were aware of their condition. Most aware adults reported modifying their diet or activity level (88%), 64% took medication, and 44% had their condition under control. More aware adults in the low ATP III risk group than those in higher risk groups had controlled LDL cholesterol (71% vs 33%-42%); more whites than blacks and Hispanics had controlled LDL cholesterol (53% vs 31% and 32%, respectively). CONCLUSION:High prevalence of high LDL cholesterol and inadequate treatment and control contribute to preventable illness and death, especially among those at highest risk. Population approaches - such as making the food environment more heart-healthy - and aggressive clinical management of cholesterol levels are needed.

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