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In Vitro Capture of Small Ferrous Particles with a Magnetic Filtration Device Designed for Intravascular Use with Intraarterial Chemotherapy: Proof-of-Concept Study

  • Author(s): Mabray, MC
  • Lillaney, P
  • Sze, CH
  • Losey, AD
  • Yang, J
  • Kondapavulur, S
  • Liu, D
  • Saeed, M
  • Patel, A
  • Cooke, D
  • Jun, YW
  • El-Sayed, I
  • Wilson, M
  • Hetts, SW
  • et al.
Abstract

© 2015 SIR. Purpose: To establish that a magnetic device designed for intravascular use can bind small iron particles in physiologic flow models. Materials and Methods: Uncoated iron oxide particles 50-100 nm and 1-5 μm in size were tested in a water flow chamber over a period of 10 minutes without a magnet (ie, control) and with large and small prototype magnets. These same particles and 1-μm carboxylic acid-coated iron oxide beads were likewise tested in a serum flow chamber model without a magnet (ie, control) and with the small prototype magnet. Results: Particles were successfully captured from solution. Particle concentrations in solution decreased in all experiments (P < .05 vs matched control runs). At 10 minutes, concentrations were 98% (50-100-nm particles in water with a large magnet), 97% (50-100-nm particles in water with a small magnet), 99% (1-5-μm particles in water with a large magnet), 99% (1-5-μm particles in water with a small magnet), 95% (50-100-nm particles in serum with a small magnet), 92% (1-5-μm particles in serum with a small magnet), and 75% (1-μm coated beads in serum with a small magnet) lower compared with matched control runs. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the concept of magnetic capture of small iron oxide particles in physiologic flow models by using a small wire-mounted magnetic filter designed for intravascular use.

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