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Development of a hydrometeorological forcing data set for global soil moisture estimation

  • Author(s): Berg, A. A
  • Famiglietti, J. S
  • Rodell, M.
  • Reichle, R. H
  • Jambor, U.
  • Holl, S. L
  • Houser, P. R
  • et al.

Published Web Location

https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.1203Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License
Abstract

Off-line land surface modeling simulations require accurate meteorological forcing with consistent spatial and temporal resolutions. Although reanalysis products present an attractive data source for these types of applications, bias to many of the reanalysis fields limits their use for hydrological modeling. In this study, we develop a global 0.5° forcing data sets for the time period 1979–1993 on a 6-hourly time step through application of a bias correction scheme to reanalysis products. We then use this forcing data to drive a land surface model for global estimation of soil moisture and other hydrological states and fluxes. The simulated soil moisture estimates are compared to in situ measurements, satellite observations and to a modeled data set of root zone soil moisture produced within a separate land surface model, using a different data set of hydrometeorological forcing. In general, there is good agreement between anomalies in modeled and observed (in situ) root zone soil moisture. Similarly, for the surface soil wetness state, modeled estimates and satellite observations are in general statistical agreement; however, correlations decline with increasing vegetation amount. Comparisons to a modeled data set of soil moisture also demonstrates that both simulations present estimates that are well correlated for the soil moisture in the anomaly time series, despite being derived from different land surface models, using different data sources for meteorological forcing, and with different specifications of the land surfaces properties. Copyright © 2005 Royal Meteorological Society

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