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eScholarship
Open Access Publications from the University of California

The Berkeley Department of Classics is a world-renowned center for the study of Graeco-Roman antiquity. The Department offers excellent undergraduate and graduate training in ancient Greek and Latin language and literature and in many other aspects of two major cultures of ancient Mediterrranean world, including archaeology, history, epigraphy, papyrology, numismatics, palaeography, philosophy, cultural studies, gender studies, and the classical tradition. The faculty includes and has included many classicists of great distinction in scholarly publication, teaching, and service to the campus and the profession.

Ellen Oliensis
University of California
Department of Classics
7233 Dwinelle Hall #2520
Berkeley CA 94720-2520

Cover page of Singing Ancient Greek: A Guide to Musical Reconstruction and Performance

Singing Ancient Greek: A Guide to Musical Reconstruction and Performance

(2014)

This handbook, by a professional musician rather than a professional classicist, presents the basic facts about Greek pronunciation, rhythm, melody, and tunings and offers musical reconstructions of selected passages of ancient Greek poetry intended for modern performers.

About the author: A resident of his native Oregon, Douglas Leedy (b. 1938) is a composer, as well as a conductor specializing in early Western music; he has written extensively on tuning and intonation in musical theory and practice. He studied classical Indian singing with K. V. Narayanaswamy and Pandit Pran Nath; his Greek studies began at the University of California, Berkeley, under Elroy Bundy and Gerson Rabinowitz.

About this publication: the Department of Classics is pleased to host this suggestive work by a UC Berkeley alumnus. It has not proved practical to typeset the work, but it has been judged to be a useful addition to the literature on reconstructing Greek musical performance, presenting the unique perspective of a practicing musician and musicologist and thus complementing the efforts of classical scholars. It is therefore offered here as is, scanned from the typescript and manuscript pages.

Cover page of Plaster Casts at Berkeley. Collections of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology & Department of Classics at UC Berkeley. An Exhibition of Rare Plaster Casts of Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. 2nd edition 2005, pp. vi + 76 + ii

Plaster Casts at Berkeley. Collections of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology & Department of Classics at UC Berkeley. An Exhibition of Rare Plaster Casts of Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. 2nd edition 2005, pp. vi + 76 + ii

(2005)

This is an exhibition catalogue produced by two seminars devoted to the study and restoration of selected pieces from the large collection of plaster casts of ancient sculpture owned by the Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology and the Department of Classics of the University of California, Berkeley.

Because of lack of space and funding, the casts have languished for decades in storage, often in destructive conditions. The seminars learned and practiced restoration techniques, created displays, informative labels, and this catalogue. In addition to a catalogue of 18 items, this booklet contains brief essays on the history of this collection, the history of plaster cast collections, the use of such casts in American education, plaster casts in antiquity, and the conservation of plaster casts.

The catalogue was edited by Stephen G.Miller and designed by Erin Dintino. The authors of the elements of this catalogue are Jose Abrigo, Mont Allen, Nathan T. Arrington, Raina Chao, Marcia Devoe, Erin Dintino, Megan DuBois, Rebecca Karberg, Stephen G. Miller, Stephanie K. Pearson, J. M. Rygorsky, Boaz Zissu.

Cover page of Classics at Berkeley: The First Century 1869-1970

Classics at Berkeley: The First Century 1869-1970

(1982)

During retirement, the late Joseph Fontenrose (1903-1986) conducted research in the departmental and university archives to compile this account of the Department of Classics at the University of California, Berkeley (and its predecessor departments) during the first hundred years of the university. It contains biographies and bibliographies of the long-term professors and lists of other teachers, and also tells of the development of the curriculum in different periods.

The book was privately published with the support of the Department of Classics History Fund, and a few printed copies are still to be seen in the Department.

This digital edition was prepared in June 2007.

Cover page of Contact and Discontinuity: Some Conventions of Speech and Action on the Greek Tragic Stage

Contact and Discontinuity: Some Conventions of Speech and Action on the Greek Tragic Stage

(1979)

A digital version of University of California Publications: Classical Studies, Volume 21 (1979).

An investigation of the conventions governing the relation between the spoken words of the Greek tragic texts and the probable actions of the characters, with detailed attention to the characters' awareness (aural and visual) of their surroundings and of others present, and to the conventional, stylistic, and psychological factors that may signal reduced awareness and loss of "contact." This work also features a rhetorical analysis of many types of questions, study of roundabout and skewed responses to questions, and study of the delayed execution or ignoring of commands. The interpretations and textual readings of dozens of passages in Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides are discussed.

The digital version (prepared May 2008) was produced by scanning and careful proofreading, including re-entry of the Greek in Unicode, so that the text is completely searchable.

Cover page of Studia Pindarica (Digital Version 2006)

Studia Pindarica (Digital Version 2006)

(1962)

The two parts of Elroy L. Bundy's bold and influential work Studia Pindarica originally appeared as separate fascicles, Volume 18, No. 1 and Volume 18, No. 2 in the series University of California Studies in Classical Philology, issued on February 27 and April 13, 1962, respectively. These 92 dense pages were reprinted as a single volume in 1986 by the University of California Press, with the addition of select bibliography and indexes.

With the permission of Barbara K. Bundy, the Department of Classics is now pleased to make available a digital version of Studia Pindarica. This version was prepared by scanning the 1986 reprint for optical character recognition of the English. All the Greek was re-entered in Unicode, an international encoding standard which is now well handled by modern operating systems and applications. The indexes added in 1986 are also present here, with the minor change that in the Index Locorum the works of Pindar are now listed in the standard order of editions, as originally intended, and not alphabetically. A few corrections of punctuation and references have been incorporated tacitly.