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Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

Abstract

Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb−1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum pT ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least one having pT ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be fDPS = 0.092− 0.011+ 0.005(stat.)− 0.037+ 0.033(syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σeff , was determined to be σeff = 14. 9− 1.0+ 1.2(stat.)− 3.8+ 5.1(syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σeff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21− 6+ 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at s=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.[Figure not available: see fulltext.]

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