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Open Access Publications from the University of California

About PaleoBios

UCMP's peer-reviewed journal
ISSN 0031-0298

PaleoBios is a peer-reviewed, free open-access journal produced by the University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP). PaleoBios publishes scholarly articles on all paleontological topics. Anyone may submit a manuscript and submissions from non-UCMP authors are encouraged. Submission is handled online through the University of California escholarship portal. All manuscripts are evaluated by qualified reviewers. PaleoBios also publishes abstract volumes for selected paleontological meetings and will consider collections of papers from symposia on appropriate topics. There are no page number limits or publication charges. 

Senior Editor: Diane M. Erwin
Managing Editors: Patricia Holroyd, Ashley Dineen, Mark Goodwin

Associate Editor: Peter Kloess

Production Editor: Diane M. Erwin

E-mail: dmerwin@berkeley.edu
Fax number: 510-642-1822

Mailing address:
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY
ATTN: PALEOBIOS
MUSEUM OF PALEONTOLOGY
1101 VALLEY LIFE SCI BLDG #4780
BERKELEY CA 94720-4780

The history of PaleoBios
The maiden issue of UCMP’s paleontology journal, PaleoBios, was published on June 15, 1967, and highlighted David Whistler’s article on “Oreodonts of the Tick Canyon Formation, Southern California.” Whistler and John H. Hutchison, both UC Department of Paleontology graduate students at the time, proposed the idea of PaleoBios as a means for graduate students to gain hands-on experience in the publication process. In fact, Whistler and Hutchison thought PaleoBios should be run entirely by the graduate students.

Hutchison recalls: “We thought it would encourage the students to start writing for publication, not just for their classes, as well as providing them with experience in writing, editing, the peer-review process, layout, production, and distribution. The editorship would rotate, with each editor training an assistant who would, after a year or so, take over the job.” UCMP Director Reuben A. Stirton thought it a good idea and offered museum sponsorship to make it a “real” publication, though initially there was very little museum oversight. The UC Library, looking for UC publications to exchange with other libraries, offered further support and soon distribution was wider than originally envisioned.

In order to encourage subscriptions, the cost of the series was kept to a minimum by restricting the size of the journal to a 6 x 9-inch format and figures to line drawings (as opposed to photographic illustrations). This philosophy continued from 1967 through the pivotal year of 1987 when there was a dramatic change in style and format. Then editor Jennifer A. Hogler published the first full-page volume (no. 43). This move encouraged submissions from other authors with material best illustrated by photographs and eventually led to the present format.

In 1998, UCMP realized that the continued success of PaleoBios required a greater investment of resources to ensure its stability and continuity. It was also clear that PaleoBios must be published on a regular schedule. To this end, the editorship now rotates among the Museum Scientists with interested students serving as Associate Editors, learning all aspects of production, but focusing on the peer-review and editing process.

PaleoBios continues to provide unique academic training for students associated with UCMP, as well as a high-quality format for the distribution of original research to the paleontological community worldwide. Past student editors of PaleoBios in alphabetical order are K.E. Ahern, L.G. Barnes, C.J. Bell, A. Berta, D.P. Domning, R.G. Dundas, R. Guralnick, C.B. Hanson, N.J. Harper, J.A. Hogler, J.H. Hutchison, S.A. McLeod, J. Munthe, M.J. Novacek, P.D. Polly, T. Stidham, J. Theodor, A. Weil, and D.P. Whistler.

With vol. 30:3 (2012) PaleoBios began publishing online with UC's eScholarship to take advantage of increased accessibility, reduced cost, interactivity, and the ability to provide supplemental resources, including multimedia.